Army to Host Navy Football at West Point

Friday, October 23, 2020


 Here's an interesting scheduling change, the academies move this year's Army/Navy game to West Point. 

This will be the first time since 1943 that the game will be played on either school's campus. We will miss out on the atmosphere of a packed stadium, but how cool will it be to have only Cadets and Midshipmen in attendance. 

Venue secured, the next move is to have Ben Holden and Ross Tucker call the game. Just no more Gary Danielson. They ought to fire Gary Danielson out of a cannon at halftime or they can let him parachute the ball in for all I care, but if you ask me: Ben Holden needs to get the nod for the big one. 



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Army 3-1

Saturday, October 10, 2020

 

Army / Abilene Christian  story, stats, highlights, and replay



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Army 2-1

Monday, October 5, 2020

Army @ Cincinnati

Cincy came out on offense and moved the chains early. After a first down they went with an option look, which looked a lot like Urban Meyer's anemic option set in 2014 with Ohio State.

Jabari Moore swiped the option pitch for the game's first score and I really thought Army would put a stranglehold on the game there with some ball control. When the dust settled, Cincinnati proved they belonged in the rankings and showed Army the door. 


After the defensive score, Army just couldn't get the motor going on offense. Penalties played a big role all day as Army continually found themselves behind the sticks on offense. Army's first half drives were: 

9 play punt

6 play punt

3 play punt

and that's just not going to win many football games. 


It wasn't all bad, there was some damn fine execution in the second drive. 

They took a shot on a first down for an incompletion and in the scheme of things this put Army behind the sticks once again. Army played on fourth down and this time, with Cincy expecting the run, Christian Anderson was brought down in the backfield. Turnover on Downs. And that was pretty much the story of the day: penalties and poor execution that stalled drives and lost the game.

Army was getting the defense they needed all game. Again Jabari Moore, this time back in coverage turns up his second takeaway of the game. Army also had a huge goal line stand to keep the game close. 

Army found themselves behind the sticks a lot of the time and the Bearcats defense deserves a lot of credit for taking away the inside. Brent Davis showed some new plays, but they were played out of the fullback dive, so if they wanted to run in the middle they would have to get creative. They ran the inside counter 'Doc'once for like 6 yards. Might have been nice to see them play the triple option for that counter instead of calling for some of the early passing. 

Cincinnati played well, and it just sucks that Army has to list this as a missed opportunity. Army hasn't beaten a ranked opponent since 1972, and apparently that's not going to change this season. 



Army Cincinnati story, stats, highlights and replay.  






Army/Cincinnati Game notes

Saturday, September 26, 2020

Army/Cincinatti  game notes are up. 


Cinci's is here.

Army has theirs here. Army also has an online game program (.pdf) available for fans.


Army is overdue to knock off a ranked opponent, we'll find out how well Cinci's defense holds up down the stretch. 


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Army 2-0

Thursday, September 24, 2020



Army dispatched the ULM Warhawks last Saturday 37-7 after a hard fought first half. 

The Warhawks were a game and worthy opponent until ULM head coach sprinkled on some of that Wannstedt clock-management magic. After that bonus round two minute drill to end the half Army sharpened their game and ended up with a second straight blowout win. 


The one thing I'd like to mention for future reference is that Army is at a point in the season where they have shown the depth of their bench a lot more than the depth of their playbook. 

Army sits first in the nation in rushing offense with infinity rush ypg, #1 in 3rd down conversion pct. (.714), 4th in total defense (192 ypg), #4 in scoring defense (3.5 ppg). After two games, that's a good place to be looking ahead to a nationally ranked road test. 

You have to wonder what they have in store for the nationally ranked Cincinnati bearcats. 

After 2 weeks of play puts Army among only 9 teams that are undefeated and uninfected after 2 games. 

ULM Army story, stats, highlights and replay.    

 


Army Louisiana-Monroe Game Notes

Friday, September 11, 2020



Army has game notes up for Louisiana-Monroe.

Louisiana-Monroe has game notes up for Army. 

Yearbook: Northeastern Louisiana State Chacahoula

Before the school was known as Univ. of Louisiana-Monroe it was called Northeastern Louisiana State. 

The Northeastern State yearbook has online offerings which seem to include a small selection of years: 1954 and then 1958 through 1977. Looking more closely at the site, there is searchable access to years: 1933 through 1977

There are some football pages therein,  if you care to do some digging. overall this is a good effort by the ULM archivist to get this collection of Chacahoula online.



One of the things you get a lot of the time in these annuals is an intentional bias in the sports reporting, in fact the reporting in yearbooks is so low stake, you have to expect a student bias toward their teams. 

Bias in reporting is there to be seen, and yearbooks do a great job of illustrating how American collegiate culture has changed through the years, school by school. One of the things that can be seen pretty clearly is some of the attitudes toward race not just in college admissions, but in terms of student life, participation on teams and access to diverse student groups. 

A comparison of the class pictures through the years can give us a simple idea about a school's diversity and attitudes toward race and sports are well documented elsewhere. Pay attention to the theme of segregation and see in what ways you might find evidence of a bifurcation of social spaces and ideals. 


One thing easily noticed in any school's yearbook collection is that just as sure as these institutions offered an avenue of higher learning - there have always been attitudes, some more common than others,  that have presented obstacles for a large selection of students and potential students, athletes and aspiring athletes. Time may have moved on and the names of the schools may even have been changed, but some of these attitudes and ideals have remained. Today, this mechanization of racism is no longer a mission of the college admissions office, but may still reside in local culture, in the behaviors of students and in the the makeup of the school's administration and student organizations.




Baseball 1958




NESCCheer 1958





 'Warbonnets' Cheer squad 1977


The point to be made is not that racism is evident in today's America, it's that there are a number of different levels of racism which effect citizens in different ways and at different times. Whereas an all white cheerleading squad seemed to be the ideal before Northeast Louisiana State's desegregation efforts, it wasn't until the 1970's when the first black cheerleader participated at ULM. 


Two members of the 'Ten little Indians' cheer team in 1975

Over time racial attitudes changed and the makeup of the student population shifted in accordance with more inclusive admissions policies. It is also important to iterate that some attitudes regarding racial (in)equality remained in place and is still active today. Sure, black inclusion in the cheerleading squad can be seen as progress, but what for if you're just going to spend your 4 years dressing up as a native American squaw?  As it played out, ULM didn't move to change their original "Indians" nickname until the NCAA cracked down on using native American imagery in college sports in 2007. 

I don't want to give the impression that this is the case only at Louisiana Monroe, this is most every traditional college and college town in the US. There is plenty of ULM history to be had with the Northeastern Louisiana State Chacahoula yearbook. 



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Army 1--0

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Army put up a very clean 42 points on Saturday, opening the season with a home win against Middle Tennessee State. Army took anything and everything they wanted in the game without much Blue Raider resistance.


 It didn't help Middle Tennessee State that they got stung by the injury bug early and often losing their starting center on the 4th play of the game- they replaced him with a freshman and two plays later the Army defense ran over the line, stole the football and pretty much put the game away. With Army playing so well against an outmatched and underprepared Middle Tennessee State team - it really did seem like it was over that early. By the start of the second quarter Army had earned 10 first downs, was 4/4 on 3rd down, and perfect 2/2 passing for 28 yards.


 It's too bad that MTSU absorbed so many injuries - they got dinged A LOT. After the game Blue Raiders head coach Tom Sockstill placed fault with Army's style of play,
"Whenever you play an Army (sic) or somebody that runs the triple option it always helps you not to play the next week because we got so many guys hurt. You saw we had so many guys coming off with knees and ankles and shoulders."
The whole Stockstill postgame interview plays like a deposition. 

Firstly, if you don't want your defense to get hurt teach them how to make a stop before a 13 minute or 19 play drive, whichever comes first. Secondly, ask the players how they got hurt on Saturday... ZERO injuries had anything to do with low blocks as Coach Stockstill pretends. Army's blocks are legal and defensive players should be coached to use their hands on low blocks. 

 At 42-0 You almost want to accept the coach's excuses out of pity. He's going to try to blame the triple option for injuring his guys and when I look back at Army's offense on tape it's 5 yards galore against a team that looked physically outmatched. No real technique, no real adjustment aside from substitution, now that I think about it MTSU came in with a very spring football look. 

I get it, Army is a tough season opener to take on 3 weeks' notice. The fact remains, teams don't get injured because of cut blocks per se, teams get injured out of unpreparedness, and that is something I would like the coach to answer to before he attacks Army's time-tested football techniques. Just go back and watch the tape and try to find a cut block injury from this game. It never happened, Coach.

I'm being hard on head coach Stockstill, but I actually think he did a great job coaching while blindfolded. Sometimes all you can do is learn from the examples of other people; let's all remember the importance of being honest with ourselves. 





 Middle Tennessee was bruised pretty badly with this one. Even MTSU fans that didn't expect the win didn't expect to lay that egg. MTSU came in unprepared and they paid the price on the scoreboard. Time after time MTSU was touched by misfortune. From the first 3 and out to the turnovers, to their diminishing will to play defense, to the drive extending roughing the kicker penalty after which Sandon McCoy ran his third touchdown in. Even that extra point bounced in off the upright. And seriously, what the hell was that series at the end of the half? 


 If Army is going to play in midseason form, then I'm going to feel justified in talking about midseason topics. Army's goals for this season should include a Lambert trophy. If all of this season's goals seem attainable (with this being a casual mention of BYU's 55-3 pasting of Navy) then a Lambert trophy should be equally within reach. Regarding protecting home field, Army demonstrated a unique home field advantage with the socially distanced corps of cadets moving out of the east stands and not only reclaiming traditional cadet seating, but expanding to take over the west stands and parts of  Eastern and Central New York down to the southern tier. 

Army is 71-25 in home openers at Michie Stadium. 

Here are the MTSU/Army story, stats, highlights and replay



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